PLUTOCRACY: “The Pathology of the Rich White Family” / Chris Hedges ☮

Portraits of former Presidents Goerge W. Bush, left, and his father George H.W. Bush which are part of the exhibit "The Art of Leadership: A President's  Diplomacy," are on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, Friday, April 4, 2014. The exhibit of world leader portraits painted by George W. Bush opens Saturday and runs through June 3.  (AP Photo/Benny Snyder)

Portraits of former Presidents Goerge W. Bush, left, and his father George H.W. Bush which are part of the exhibit “The Art of Leadership: A President’s Diplomacy,” are on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, Friday, April 4, 2014. The exhibit of world leader portraits painted by George W. Bush opens Saturday and runs through June 3. (AP Photo/Benny Snyder)

The pathology of the rich white family is the most dangerous pathology in America. The rich white family is cursed with too much money and privilege. It is devoid of empathy, the result of lifetimes of entitlement. It has little sense of loyalty and lacks the capacity for self-sacrifice. Its definition of friendship is reduced to “What can you do for me?” It is possessed by an insatiable lust to increase its fortunes and power. It believes that wealth and privilege confer to it a superior intelligence and virtue. It is infused with an unchecked hedonism and narcissism. And because of all this, it interprets reality through a lens of self-adulation and greed that renders it delusional. The rich white family is a menace. The pathologies of the poor, when set against the pathologies of rich white people, are like a candle set beside the sun.

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PLUTOCRACY: “An Unrealistic Sense of False Patriotism” ☮

PLUTOCRACYh/t: ॐ Collectively Conscious ॐ

PLUTOCRACY: “A Reason to Watch the Sexist, Racist, Militarist, Corporate Rose Parade” / truthdig / Sonali Kolhatkar ☮

Sonali Kolhatkar

by Sonali Kolhatkar

I hate parades. I have always hated the bright exuberance, the cheering and the flag waving. Every New Year’s Day, millions of people around the U.S. and the world tune in or gather in person to watch the Tournament of Roses Parade, also known as the Rose Parade. I live in Pasadena, home of the Rose Parade, and every year I watch thousands of families camped out on the streets of the city to secure a coveted spot from which to view the spectacle up close. Meanwhile, the moneyed classes pay for premium seating on bleachers set up for the occasion. But beneath the facade of festive glamour is an institution rife with sexism, racism, militarism and corporatism.

The Rose Parade has its origins in exclusivity and elitism. In 1890, when Pasadena was a magnet for wealthy East Coast Americans looking for temperate climates to vacation in during the winters, the Valley Hunt Club organized the first parade to show off the city. The hunting and fishing club, which continues to be featured in the parade for historical reasons, has had a problematic history of not admitting people of color.

Today the Rose Parade continues to remain ensconced within Pasadena’s well-to-do neighborhoods in the south of the city. Its annual route avoids by a wide berth poor and working-class communities of color, whose homes are concentrated in northwest Pasadena.

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