PHILOSOPHY: “Shadow Work: Owning Your Dark Side (feat. Emerald)” / Einzelgänger ☮

According to Jung, part of self-realization is the integration of the Shadow into our personality. When we make the unconscious conscious and stop rejecting the unwanted parts of ourselves, we break the chains that hold us back from moving towards a state of wholeness. The process of integrating our ‘dark side’ is called Shadow Work.

PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “Carl Jung’s Theory on Introverts, Extraverts, and Ambiverts” / Sprouts ☮

Introversion and extraversion are terms first coined by psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung in Switzerland of the 1920’s. According to Jung, an extravert seeks intensive contact with the outside world. An introvert instead turns the psychic energy inwards. Jung believed that no one is 100% extravert or 100% introvert instead we carry both traits. However most minds tend lean either on one side or the other. If both characteristics are equally present, we can speak of someone who has has an ambivert personality.

PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “New Study Reveals Which People Fear Death the Least” / big think ☮

Socrates warned against fearing death. He thought it irrational—the fear of death causes you to believe you’re wiser than you actually are. “No body knows death; no body can tell, but it may be the greatest benefit of mankind; and yet men are afraid of it, as if they knew certainly that it were the greatest of evils,” he concluded. His real aim may have been the religious who expressed faith in an afterlife with utmost certainty, a trend still going strong today. 

No mere mortal knows what occurs after death, yet that hasn’t stopped many from speculating. Though Socrates expressed unkind words toward the religious, turns out those who strongly believe in religion fear death less than the less religiously inclined—until you get to atheism, that is. A new study published in Religion, Brain & Behavior discovered a U-shaped curve toward contemplating death, with the most religious and atheists enjoying the least fear of mortality.

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PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “Carl Jung: What are Archetypes?” / Academy of Ideas ☮

In this video we investigate what Carl Jung called archetypes, explaining what they are, how they influence our lives, their relationship to symbols, and their connection to religious experiences.

PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “Carl G. Jung: Archetypes – The Four Stages of Life” / Collectively Conscious ☮

Carl G. Jung“Thoroughly unprepared, we take the step into the afternoon of life. Worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and our ideals will serve us as hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the program of life’s morning, for what was great in the morning will be little at evening and what in the morning was true, at evening will have become a lie.”
~ Carl Gustav Jung

According to the Swiss psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung, there are 4 archetypes, 4 stages that we go through during our lifetime, and these stages are:

1. The ATHLETE Stage:
At this stage, we are mostly preoccupied with our looks, with the way our body looks.

2. The WARRIOR Stage:
During this period, this stage, our main concern is to go out there and conquer the world, to do our best, be the best and get the very best, to do what warriors do, and act like warriors act.

3. The STATEMENT Stage:
At this time, this stage in your life, you realize what you have achieved so far is not enough for you to feel fulfilled, to be happy… you are now looking for ways to make a difference in the world, for ways to serve those around you.

4. The SPIRIT Stage:
According to Jung, this will be the last stage of our life, a stage where we realize that none of those 3 stages are really who and what we are. We realize we are more than our body, we are more than our possessions, more than our friends, our country and so on.

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PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTIC PSYCHOLOGY: “Five Common Words / Phrases That Have Totally Different Meanings for an Introvert, and an Extrovert” / Learning Mind / Caroline Hindle ☮

Introvert, and an Extrovert#1 of the Common Words: Solitude

Extrovert’s definition: A negative state of being, characterized by a feeling of loneliness and boredom. May lead to frantic attempts to find company, including: calling everyone you know; seeing who’s available on chat; potentially going as far as making new friends for the sake of filling in this unbearable window of empty and meaningless existence.

Introvert’s definition: A joyful state heralded in by sigh of relief, giving way to excitement, and a warm, fuzzy feeling at the prospect of getting to enjoy a whole spectrum of solitary activities at one’s leisure. A rare opportunity for pleasure that is only jeopardized by those arch-nemeses of the introvert: the telephone and the doorbell.

#2 of the Common Words: Book
#3 of the Common Words: Boredom
#4 of the Common Words: Good Manners
#5 of the Common Words: Telephone

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