PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “Carl Jung: What are Archetypes?” / Academy of Ideas ☮

In this video we investigate what Carl Jung called archetypes, explaining what they are, how they influence our lives, their relationship to symbols, and their connection to religious experiences.

PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTICAL: “Carl G. Jung: Archetypes – The Four Stages of Life” / Collectively Conscious ☮

Carl G. Jung“Thoroughly unprepared, we take the step into the afternoon of life. Worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and our ideals will serve us as hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the program of life’s morning, for what was great in the morning will be little at evening and what in the morning was true, at evening will have become a lie.”
~ Carl Gustav Jung

According to the Swiss psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung, there are 4 archetypes, 4 stages that we go through during our lifetime, and these stages are:

1. The ATHLETE Stage:
At this stage, we are mostly preoccupied with our looks, with the way our body looks.

2. The WARRIOR Stage:
During this period, this stage, our main concern is to go out there and conquer the world, to do our best, be the best and get the very best, to do what warriors do, and act like warriors act.

3. The STATEMENT Stage:
At this time, this stage in your life, you realize what you have achieved so far is not enough for you to feel fulfilled, to be happy… you are now looking for ways to make a difference in the world, for ways to serve those around you.

4. The SPIRIT Stage:
According to Jung, this will be the last stage of our life, a stage where we realize that none of those 3 stages are really who and what we are. We realize we are more than our body, we are more than our possessions, more than our friends, our country and so on.

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PSYCHOLOGY – ANALYTIC PSYCHOLOGY: “Five Common Words / Phrases That Have Totally Different Meanings for an Introvert, and an Extrovert” / Learning Mind / Caroline Hindle ☮

Introvert, and an Extrovert#1 of the Common Words: Solitude

Extrovert’s definition: A negative state of being, characterized by a feeling of loneliness and boredom. May lead to frantic attempts to find company, including: calling everyone you know; seeing who’s available on chat; potentially going as far as making new friends for the sake of filling in this unbearable window of empty and meaningless existence.

Introvert’s definition: A joyful state heralded in by sigh of relief, giving way to excitement, and a warm, fuzzy feeling at the prospect of getting to enjoy a whole spectrum of solitary activities at one’s leisure. A rare opportunity for pleasure that is only jeopardized by those arch-nemeses of the introvert: the telephone and the doorbell.

#2 of the Common Words: Book
#3 of the Common Words: Boredom
#4 of the Common Words: Good Manners
#5 of the Common Words: Telephone

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POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY: “What Would Joseph Campbell Say About Donald Trump?” / Moyers & Company / Joan Konner ☮

Bill Moyers and Joseph Campbell

Like so many others, I’ve been puzzling over the Trump phenomenon for months. It seems like every journalist, pundit, psychiatrist, psychologist and armchair psychologist has something to say about the man. Understandably, they are trying to figure out what kind of person he is and why he is so popular with millions of Americans, including nearly half of the Republican Party.

My own interest is undergirded by the work and ideas of the late Joseph Campbell, a foremost interpreter of world mythologies and author of The Hero With a Thousand Faces. It was said of Campbell that “he could make the bones of folklore and anthropology live,” as millions of viewers would learn in watching the classic PBS series Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth. [Disclosure: I knew Campbell from my alma mater, Sarah Lawrence College, where he taught for 35-plus years. Many years later I served as executive producer of the Campbell-Moyers series.]

Campbell’s gift was to interpret the themes and forces underlying myths, stories and legends and how they play out in our lives. He illuminated the interior pathways of the mind which guide human behavior and action — a psychological roadmap within each of us which is nonetheless dark and mysterious to most of us.

One of the dominant highways on that inner map is the Hero’s Journey. The hero appears as a universal character in all cultures, everywhere, throughout human history, in myths and legends. It is so universal a theme that Campbell, along with other scholars and psychologists, called it an “archetype.”

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